Scientific format with 3 significant values

I'm trying to report the intercept and slope using intelligent reporting. Originally, we put a Calibration curve A coefficient and a Calibration curve B coefficient 6 decimal number in excel and reported using scientific format with 2 decimal places. What are the possibilities in OpenLab 2.6? The format field properties shows 6 values all times.

  • Hello,

    Typically, fields in the report have the ability to set number formatting as below, if they are dedicated numeric values. It is also possible if the value is a string to format in the expression for the value using VB Formatnumber or Format functions. 

    Marty Adams

    Number Format

    The Number Format options are only shown if the value is a number or a date.

    With Number Format, you can choose the way in which numbers are shown, for example, as a decimal number, date, or currency. Depending on the category selected in the drop-down list at left, you can choose between different styles in the drop-down list at right.

    Detail Row

    If a table has two detail rows with numbers, you can choose the row for which you want to set the format.

    Rounding

    Define the precision of a number, currency, or percentage.

    • Decimal Places

      The number is shown with the given amount of decimal places.

    • Significant Digits

      The number is masked with zeros, only the specified number of significant digits is shown.

      For example, if you set the significant digits to 2, the numbers are shown as follows:

      1234 as 1200

      1 as 1.00

      0.1234 as 0.12

      0.1 as 0.10

      0.01234 as 0.012

    Show GMT offset

    Select the check box to add information on the time zone to all date fields.

    Times are always shown as local times. The time offset includes the daylight saving time. For example, an injection acquisition date would look as follows:

    • Injection acquired in June (summer time):

      • in London as 06/30/2015 10:30:00 AM (GMT + 1:00)

      • in Berlin as 06/30/2015 11:30:00 AM (GMT + 2:00)

    • Injection acquired in January (winter time):

      • in London as 01/31/2015 09:30:00 AM (GMT + 0:00)

      • in Berlin as 01/31/2015 10:30:00 AM (GMT + 1:00)

    Preview

    The Preview area shows the appearance of the currently selected settings.

  • Thank you Martin,

    I've seen this equation before using the community and changed in to #.##E+00 because of the 3 significant values we want to report. Nevertheless, the value of 65.0465 will be formatted as 6.5E+01 instead of 6.50E+01. Is there another option? Preferably, this report will be used for several calibration curves with slope and intercept.

  • Hello,

    You can search the internet for Visual Basic format function to find more detailed information. The #.##E+00 is a custom format pattern and as below, you can use different characters for different behaviors of the format function. You might want to change it to something like "0.00E+00"

    Marty Adams

    User-defined numeric formats

    The following table identifies characters you can use to create user-defined number formats.

    Character Description
    None Display the number with no formatting.
    (0) Digit placeholder. Display a digit or a zero. If the expression has a digit in the position where the 0 appears in the format string, display it; otherwise, display a zero in that position.If the number has fewer digits than there are zeros (on either side of the decimal) in the format expression, display leading or trailing zeros. If the number has more digits to the right of the decimal separator than there are zeros to the right of the decimal separator in the format expression, round the number to as many decimal places as there are zeros. If the number has more digits to the left of the decimal separator than there are zeros to the left of the decimal separator in the format expression, display the extra digits without modification.
    (#) Digit placeholder. Display a digit or nothing. If the expression has a digit in the position where the # appears in the format string, display it; otherwise, display nothing in that position. This symbol works like the 0 digit placeholder, except that leading and trailing zeros aren't displayed if the number has the same or fewer digits than there are # characters on either side of the decimal separator in the format expression.
    (.) Decimal placeholder. In some locales, a comma is used as the decimal separator. The decimal placeholder determines how many digits are displayed to the left and right of the decimal separator. If the format expression contains only number signs to the left of this symbol, numbers smaller than 1 begin with a decimal separator. To display a leading zero displayed with fractional numbers, use 0 as the first digit placeholder to the left of the decimal separator. The actual character used as a decimal placeholder in the formatted output depends on the Number Format recognized by your system.
    (%) Percentage placeholder. The expression is multiplied by 100. The percent character (%) is inserted in the position where it appears in the format string.
    (,) Thousand separator. In some locales, a period is used as a thousand separator. The thousand separator separates thousands from hundreds within a number that has four or more places to the left of the decimal separator. Standard use of the thousand separator is specified if the format contains a thousand separator surrounded by digit placeholders (0 or #). Two adjacent thousand separators or a thousand separator immediately to the left of the decimal separator (whether or not a decimal is specified) means "scale the number by dividing it by 1000, rounding as needed." For example, you can use the format string "##0,," to represent 100 million as 100. Numbers smaller than 1 million are displayed as 0. Two adjacent thousand separators in any position other than immediately to the left of the decimal separator are treated simply as specifying the use of a thousand separator. The actual character used as the thousand separator in the formatted output depends on the Number Format recognized by your system.
    (:) Time separator. In some locales, other characters may be used to represent the time separator. The time separator separates hours, minutes, and seconds when time values are formatted. The actual character used as the time separator in formatted output is determined by your system settings.
    (/) Date separator. In some locales, other characters may be used to represent the date separator. The date separator separates the day, month, and year when date values are formatted. The actual character used as the date separator in formatted output is determined by your system settings.
    (E- E+ e- e+) Scientific format. If the format expression contains at least one digit placeholder (0 or #) to the right of E-, E+, e-, or e+, the number is displayed in scientific format and E or e is inserted between the number and its exponent. The number of digit placeholders to the right determines the number of digits in the exponent. Use E- or e- to place a minus sign next to negative exponents. Use E+ or e+ to place a minus sign next to negative exponents and a plus sign next to positive exponents.
    - + $ ( ) Display a literal character. To display a character other than one of those listed, precede it with a backslash (\) or enclose it in double quotation marks (" ").
    (\) Display the next character in the format string. To display a character that has special meaning as a literal character, precede it with a backslash (\). The backslash itself isn't displayed. Using a backslash is the same as enclosing the next character in double quotation marks. To display a backslash, use two backslashes (\\). Examples of characters that can't be displayed as literal characters are the date-formatting and time-formatting characters (a, c, d, h, m, n, p, q, s, t, w, y, /, and :), the numeric-formatting characters (#, 0, %, E, e, comma, and period), and the string-formatting characters (@, &, <, >, and !).
    ("ABC") Display the string inside the double quotation marks (" "). To include a string in format from within code, you must use Chr(34) to enclose the text (34 is the character code for a quotation mark (")).
  • Thank you very much, this is what I was looking for!

Was this helpful?