Blood sample normalisation compound

Hello, 

We are using whole blood samples to determine cobalt concentrations in untreated and cobalt-treated animals. The issue is that the starting volume of whole blood used for sample preparation is not accurate, which introduces bias in the results (i.e. more blood = more cobalt). 

We are wondering if there is anything we could use in order to normalise our cobalt results? It would need to be a compound that is consistently present in whole blood (preferably plasma as cobalt increases the number of circulating red blood cells) and be unaffected by cobalt (i.e. there is a possibility that Co2+ might be able to displace and replace other divalent cations such as Ca2+ etc). 

I realise this is a total long-shot, but if we can analyse any other element (maybe zinc?) in our samples then we could relate the total cobalt levels back to the starting volume of blood and normalise across treatment groups. 

TIA, 

Sandy

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  • Hi Sandy, maybe you can add a known amount of an internal standard (e.g. Ge) to each sample. Then use the ratio of counts Co to counts Ge to calculate the Co concentration in each sample.

  • Hi, thank you for your response.

    I don't think that would solve my problem though. Some of the animals were treated with cobalt, some weren't and we are measuring blood cobalt content (amongst other samples such as tissues and cells) to ensure that cobalt is indeed circulating and taken up. This is why it is important to normalise the total blood cobalt content against the amount of starting material. For example, an untreated sample could have a comparable cobalt count if I used a huge amount of starting material versus a tiny amount of treated sample starting material. 

    By adding the internal standard to each sample I would still not be able to relate back to how much overall material there was to begin with. What I am looking for is an inherent internal standard (I am running a cobalt standard curve alongside my samples), which is present consistently in blood (preferably plasma) and doesn't change in the presence of elevated cobalt. 

  • Okay. Sorry, but in that case I don't know the solution to your problem. I am in chemical analysis and don't know anything about biological compositionScream 

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